Norm’s Seven Themes for Caryl Churchill

From Norm, this review of Caryl Churchill’s play, Seven Jewish Children.

“1.

Tell them it’s a play
Tell them it’s serious
But don’t enlighten them
Tighten them
Put some night in them.
Tell it in the voice of Jews
Tell it only in the voice of Jews
That way any bad thought will be the thought of Jews
(Like that ‘they’ don’t understand anything except violence)
And any thought ascribed to others will be ascribed by Jews
And not necessarily true
And maybe just an excuse
(Like that there are still people who hate Jews)
And any bad deed ascribed to others will be merely ascribed by Jews
(Like that ‘they’ set off bombs in cafés)
And ascribed maybe as a pretext.”

Read on.

See also: The Eighth Jewish Child and Why Jacqueline Rose Is Not Right.

6 Responses to “Norm’s Seven Themes for Caryl Churchill”

  1. Jacob Says:

    An excellent send up.

    Here is another review, this one by the legal web site “Volokh Conspiracy:”

    “This, new short play opened in London recently, and it’s hard to articulate how depraved it is without suggesting you first read the full dialogue. The essential “plot,” if you can call it that, is to show how Israeli Jews, deranged by their suffering in the Holocaust, gradually turn into alter-egos of the Nazis.”

    http://volokh.com/posts/1235745737.shtml

  2. Saul Says:

    Tell them, please, no more parodies!!

  3. Mark Gardner Says:

    Tell them its 7 Jewish kids not 7 Israeli kids

    Tell them its anti-Israel not antisemitic

    Tell them if they say otherwise then it proves they are in the Zionist conspiracy.

    Tell them we say this because we are Good.

  4. EdwardT Says:

    Watch for a new play in London in early May

  5. Inna Says:

    But J Street, the latest Jewish advocacy group, has issued this statement on on Theater J and Seven Jewish Children:

    “The decision to feature Seven Jewish Children at Theater J should be judged not on the basis of the play’s content but, rather, on its value in sparking a difficult but necessary conversation within our community. To preclude even the possibility of such a discussion does a disservice not only to public discourse, but also to the very values of rigorous intellectual engagement and civil debate on which our community prides itself.

    “J Street takes no position on the content of Seven Jewish Children – it is, after all, a play, and not policy. We do, however, stand unequivocally behind Theater J in its decision to feature programming that examines different facets of this critical debate over how our community can best support Israel. Such an opportunity for individual and collective reflection is integral in informing our shared interest in bringing true peace and security to Israel.”

    http://theaterjblogs.wordpress.com/2009/03/26/j-street-letter-of-support-on-discussing-7jc/

    This form a supposedly Jewish advocacy group. But hey at least now I know why they are a regular fixture on the BBC and The Guardian.

    Regards,

    Inna

    • Bill Says:

      “Such an opportunity for individual and collective reflection is integral in informing our shared interest in bringing true peace and security to Israel.”

      You know, maybe it should be used to open up a serious discussion. And I mean an honest one. Not one of the ones run by the UCU activist list or JStreet or the like. Would “7 Muslim Children” flown by featuring examples of the incitement that kids see on PA kiddievid. You’d obviously have to show a hypothetical excerpt, perhaps it should involve the showing footage of the real thing (featuring all the Disney character copyright violations, Romper Room Killer-Do-Bee etc). If such a play had gotten off the ground, how would the same people who cooed over 7JC receive and review 7MC. Would there have been “self-restraint” in the material.

      D’yathink they’d go for that? Nah… Hey Kids! What time is it? It’s Israel… no scratch that… it’s “Jewish” Double Standard Time!! If they want to play this game, let’s play by their rules and hear them cry foul.


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