University of Johannesburg sets ultimatum for Ben Gurion University

This report is from news24.com

The University of Johannesburg (UJ) senate on Wednesday voted not to continue its link with Israel’s Ben Gurion University (BGU), unless certain conditions are met.

“The conditions are that the memorandum of understanding governing the relationship between the two institutions be amended to include Palestinian universities chosen with the direct involvement of UJ,” the university said in a statement.

“Additionally, UJ will not engage in any activities with BGU that have direct or indirect military implications, this to be monitored by UJ’s senate academic freedom committee.”

The move followed calls from Archbishop Desmond Tutu, academics and the Congress of SA Trade Unions for UJ to cut ties with BGU due to its “direct and indirect support for the Israeli military and the occupation”.

The UJ senate also requested BGU to “respect UJ’s duty (and) to take seriously, allegations of behaviour on the part of BGU’s stakeholders that is incompatible with UJ’s values”.

It called on BGU to respond to reasonable requests from UJ seeking more information about the university’s formal policies and informal practices.

Should these conditions not be met within six months, the memorandum of understanding will automatically lapse on April 1 2011, UJ said.

The senate action is the result of findings by a task team established at a special meeting of the university senate on May 17.

UJ’s deputy vice chancellor Adam Habib said: “The committee met five times with a view to finding a principled common ground on which a recommendation to senate could be advanced.

“In developing this recommendation we were mindful that our recommendation would need to be consistently applied in other similar contexts where UJ’s central values were not upheld and where human rights abuses were identified.”

More support

Earlier on Wednesday, UJ’s student representative council (SRC) added its voice to the campaign.

“As the student representative council acting on behalf of the student community of UJ, we publicly announce our support for the principled position of over 250 South African academics who have made a statement in favour of terminating the agreement,” the SRC said in a statement.

The SRC said it joined Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University’s vice chancellor Professor Derrick Swartz, Rhodes University’s Professor Saleem Badat, Unisa vice chancellor Professor Barney Pityana and Durban University of Technology’s Professor Dan Ncayiyana in calling for an end to agreements between the two institutions.

The Mail & Guardian reported that ties between the two institutions dated back to the 1980s.

Israel National News online said growing pressure on UJ could stop a research agreement between the institutions to collaborate on biotechnology and water purification projects.

The petition, signed by academics, called for the termination of the co-operation, arguing that scholarly work took place within a larger social context.

“The Israeli occupation of the Palestinian territories has had a disastrous effect on access to education for Palestinians.

“While Palestinians are not able to access universities and schools, Israeli universities produce the research, technology, arguments and leaders for maintaining the occupation,” the petition reads.

This piece is from news24.com

50 Responses to “University of Johannesburg sets ultimatum for Ben Gurion University”

  1. Gal Says:

    Who cares about S.Africa? The only good thing came out of there is District9.

    Seriously, Israel is trying to help South Africa with cleaning their water and they have the nerve to give demands?

    Shame on S.Africa for contributing ignorance and stupidity to the world , which does not lack neither of them.

  2. Karl Pfeifer Says:

    “Additionally, UJ will not engage in any activities with BGU that have direct or indirect military implications, this to be monitored by UJ’s senate academic freedom committee.”

    This is really impertinent. Israel is today one of the leading countries as far as Computer-Science and Mathematics are concerned. The Internet-Firewall, Voice-mail, and many other inventions come from Israel,

    What those people in Johannesburg forget, the development of military projects are used in the non-military sector. Just two examples: The infrastructure of Buckingham Palace and airport Heathrow are secure thanks to Israeli technology.

    So it looks that the conditions of Johannesburg University for further cooperation with BGU are not realistic. Johannesburg University is more interested in obscurantist ideology than in technology.

    • Jonathan Romer Says:

      Karl,

      They didn’t say they won’t cheerfully use the fruits of Israeli scientific and technical research. Only that they might deny UJ faculty and students the benefits of contact with BGU researchers. Place the dagger of an academic boycott between UJ and BGU and it may be hard to predict which way it will cut.

      • Karl Pfeifer Says:

        Of course those people want to single out Israel and at the same time use the fruits of Israeli research.

        • Brian Goldfarb Says:

          “They didn’t say they won’t cheerfully use the fruits of Israeli scientific and technical research.”

          This assumes that they will be _allowed_ to use it. If the developer patents and/or licenses the technology, they are at liberty to say who may and may not use that technology. Especially if the technology remains under Israeli control, rather than under that of a mega US corporation, who might be more interested in the profits to be made than the satisfaction to be had from boycotting the boycotter.

          However, of course, my argument ignores the point of all those lists generically under the heading of “If you _really_ want to boycott Israel…” The boycotters will never hurt themselves.

          Sadly, it seems that that potential holiday in SA will have to go to the bottom of the list, which, given our ages, may never be reached.

  3. Blacklisted Dictator Says:

    Salim Vally, a senior researcher at the Faculty of Education and spokesman for the Palestinian Solidarity Committee (PSC), told Al Jazeera that the move to sever academic ties with BGU “has created an unprecedented momentum and has galvanised academics towards fighting for social justice”.

    “While the PSC supports an unequivocal and unambiguous boycott of all Israeli state institutions, this is a move in the right direction and we are confident that it would lead to a more comprehensive boycott of Israel in the future.

    “We know that they have a relationship with the military, making them complicit in the acts of the army, and in the next six months we will prove that the relationship with BGU should be severed completely,” Vally said

  4. Disputations Says:

    “Make room, and let him stand before our face.
    Shylock, the world thinks, and I think so too,
    That thou but lead’st this fashion of thy malice
    To the last hour of act; and then ’tis thought
    Thou’lt show thy mercy and remorse more strange
    Than is thy strange apparent cruelty;

    The UJ senate also requested BGU to “respect UJ’s duty (and) to take seriously, allegations of behaviour on the part of BGU’s stakeholders that is incompatible with UJ’s values”.

    It called on BGU to respond to reasonable requests from UJ seeking more information about the university’s formal policies and informal practices.

    Should these conditions not be met within six months, the memorandum of understanding will automatically lapse on April 1 2011, UJ said.”

    We all expect a gentle answer, Jew.”

    • M Golding Says:

      Portia was a deceptive bitch. Antonio was a self-righteous corrupt opportunist. The entire cast of the Merchant Of Venice consists of a pack of sanctimonious thugs. It’s a very realistic play. We all expect a gentle answer Jew????? Really??? Nothing has changed since Shakespeare’s inciteful comment. The world can comport itself with thuggery and arrant hypocrisy, and trample on and demonise the Jew and demand he be the sacrificial lamb. Perhaps Disputations should reflect on what has happened to the billions of dollars much of which was poured into the Palestinian cause for education and for which they have nothing to show. Perhaps Disputations might also educate itself on the rules of engagement, practice and interaction between Israeli, Palestinian and Moderate Arab countries, before quoting the Bard out of context. Not because the iambic pentametre is incorrect, but because Disputations is unintentionally identifying with the inherent hypocrisy of the words.

      • Sarah AB Says:

        I go off Portia quite early in the play when she says ‘let all of his complexion choose me so’ (after the Prince of Morocco has chosen the wrong casket). I know the word complexion had a wider range of meanings then but it certainly could simply mean skin colour.

        And you forgot to mention that Bassanio is definitely a gold-digger.

        • M Golding Says:

          You are one hundred percent correct. It’s a marvellous play about horrible people. Have you watched with Jonathan Miller production with Laurence Olivier?

  5. David Hirsh Says:

    This might have been sold to the UJ decision-makers as a compromise but the effect is to give the boycotters six months to win people over to the boycott, and helped by the fact that the idea has already been officially legitimated by the ultimatum.

    And the waverers can be won over by the boycotters by some kind of trumped up argument about how BGU has failed to fulfil its obligations in the ultimatum.

    • Brian Goldfarb Says:

      Um, not quite, Kubbeh: “University of Johannesburg professors rejected calls to sever ties with an Israeli university Wednesday, but called on Ben-Gurion University to work with its Palestinian counterparts.”

      Given that BGU already does so, especially in areas such as the water purification research, we’re back with the loyalty oath bit. What are they supposed to do that they aren’t doing already? And when did they stop beating their wives?

  6. David Hirsh Says:

    It also gives the boycotters at BGU six months to organise their “AS A JEW” legitimations.

  7. Blacklisted Dictator Says:

    David Hirsh,
    You write:
    “sold to the UJ decision-makers as a compromise”
    Or has it been ” sold by the UJ decision-makers as a compromise”?
    After all, Adam Habib as VC of UJ is the leading decision maker.

  8. Lynne T Says:

    “Israeli universities are an intimate part of the Israeli regime, by active choice,” Tutu wrote in an essay that appeared in a South African newspaper Sunday. “While Palestinians are not able to access universities and schools, Israeli universities produce the research, technology, arguments and leaders for maintaining the occupation.”

    Given that Omar Barghoutti, a resident of the West Bank, is currently completing his MA studies at Tel Aviv U, one has to wonder where Tutu gets his facts from.

    • Uri Golomb Says:

      It’s interesting to compare Tutu’s verdict with the attack on certain departments in BGU within Israel, by organisations like ‘Im Tirzu’ (partly supported by the Israeli Secretary of Education), for being too post/anti-Zionist and not sufficiently patriotic…

  9. Karl Pfeifer Says:

    Given the fact that in most Israeli Universities about 20% of the students are Arabs, Tutu is either an ignoramus or a liar.

  10. Lynne T Says:

    Karl:

    More than anything, Tutu has been blinded by anger at Israel for not participating in the embargo on trade with South Africa during the battle to end apartheid. I say “blinded” because Tutu probably hasn’t given much thought to human rights issues concerning other countries that also continued to have trade with SA during those years.

  11. Blacklisted Dictator Says:

    Tutu and The Holocaust:

    http://70.32.96.177/media/news/archbishop-tutu-haaretz-arabs-paying-germanys-crimes

    The Nobel Prize laureate spoke to Haaretz in Jerusalem as the organization The Elders concluded its tour of Israel and the West Bank. He said the West was consumed with guilt and regret toward Israel because of the Holocaust, “as it should be.”

    “But who pays the penance? The penance is being paid by the Arabs, by the Palestinians. I once met a German ambassador who said Germany is guilty of two wrongs. One was what they did to the Jews. And now the suffering of the Palestinians.”

    He also slammed Jewish organizations in the United States, saying they intimidate anyone who criticizes the occupation and rush to accuse these critics of anti-Semitism. Tutu recalled how such organizations pressured U.S. universities to cancel his appearances on their campuses.

    “That is unfortunate, because my own positions are actually derived from the Torah. You know God created you in God’s image. And we have a God who is always biased in favor of the oppressed.”

    Dr. Robert Rozett is director of the Yad Vashem Libraries, and author of “Approaching the Holocaust: Texts and Contexts” (Vallentine Mitchell, 2004)
    http://www.haaretz.com/print-edition/opinion/an-open-letter-to-archbishop-desmond-tutu-1.8470

    The Most Reverend Dr. DESMOND Mpilo TUTU, Archbishop, Peace Maker
    Tutu preached a message of forgiveness during a 1989 trip to Israel’s Yad Vashem museum, saying “Our Lord would say that in the end the positive thing that can come is the spirit of forgiving, not forgetting, but the spirit of saying: God, this happened to us. We pray for those who made it happen, help us to forgive them and help us so that we in our turn will not make others suffer.” Some found this statement offensive, with Rabbi Marvin Hier of the Simon Wiesenthal Center calling it “a gratuitous insult to Jews and victims of Nazism everywhere] Tutu was subjected to racial slurs during this visit to Israel, with vandals writing “Black Nazi pig” on the walls of the St. George’s Cathedral in East Jerusalem, where he was staying

    In 2002, when delivering a public lecture in support of divestment, Tutu said “My heart aches. I say why are our memories so short. Have our Jewish sisters and brothers forgotten their humiliation? Have they forgotten the collective punishment, the home demolitions, in their own history so soon? Have they turned their backs on their profound and noble religious traditions? Have they forgotten that God cares deeply about the downtrodden?”He argued that Israel could never live in security by oppressing another people, and continued, “People are scared in this country [the US], to say wrong is wrong because the Jewish lobby is powerful – very powerful. Well, so what? For goodness sake, this is God’s world! We live in a moral universe. The apartheid government was very powerful, but today it no longer exists. Hitler, Mussolini, Stalin, Pinochet, Milosevic, and Idi Amin were all powerful, but in the end they bit the dust.” The latter statement was criticized by some Jewish groups, including the Anti-Defamation League. When he edited and reprinted parts of his speech in 2005, Tutu replaced the phrase “Jewish lobby” with “pro-Israel lobby”

  12. Blacklisted Dictator Says:

    I certainly don’t believe that it is coincidental that the following article by Kofi Annan has appeared on Tutu’s “Elders” website.

    I believe that there is a sub-text to this debate and that is to

    1: water down the uniqueness of the Holocaust and
    2: prevent people from being taught to understand its causes.

    http://70.32.96.177/media/news/myth-never-again

    Kofi Annan
    International Herald Tribune
    June 2010
    (selected quotes)

    “The time has surely come to ask some hard questions about “traditional” Holocaust education, and perhaps to rethink some of the assumptions on which it has been based. Are programs focusing on the Nazi system and ideology, and particularly on the horrendous experience of their millions of victims, an effective response to, or prophylactic against, the challenges we face today?

    If our goal in teaching students about the Holocaust is to make them think harder about civic responsibility, human rights and the dangers of racism, then presumably we need to connect the Holocaust with other instances of genocide, and with ethnic conflicts or tensions in our own time and place. That would enable students not only to learn about the Holocaust, but also to learn important lessons from it.

    Do we not need to focus more on the social and psychological factors that lead to these acts of brutality and indifference, so that we know the warning signs to look out for in ourselves and our societies?

    Do current education programs do enough to reveal the dangers inherent in racial or religious stereotypes and prejudices, and to inoculate students against them? Does the teaching of the history of the Holocaust at classroom level sufficiently link it to the root causes of contemporary racism or ethnic conflict? And shouldn’t the Holocaust be studied not only in Europe, North America and Israel but throughout the world, alongside other tragic instances of human barbarism?”

    Kofi A. Annan, the former secretary general of the United Nations, is honorary president of the advisory board for the Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention Program at the Salzburg Global Seminar.

  13. Joseph Imber Says:

    To Karl, Lynn and other pro-Israel British Zionists of Engage.

    Here are the correct, factual figures RE the (non-Jewish) indigenous Palestinians who live as fourth-class citizens inside the religious-Jewish state of Israel:

    Palestinian citizens of Israel constitute more than 20% of Israel’s population. 9.5% of B.A. students, 4.8% of M.A. students, 3.2% of Ph.D. students and a 1% of the academic staff in Israeli academic institutions are Palestinians.

    I hereby promise to declare my unconditional allegiance to British Zionism when identical figures and proportions will typify us.

    • David Hirsh Says:

      Thank you very much for the figures Joseph. Could you give a source please?

      Could you also tell us the percentage of black, Muslim and other ethnic minority students related to their proportion of the population as a whole at other universities?

      For example, what are the percentages at Oxford and Cambridge, at Yale and Harvard, at UCLA,?

      What are the percentages at universities in London, Brussels, Berlin, Paris, Rome?

      What is the percentage at Columbia, which is situated in Harlem?

      What is the percentage of minority students and women at other universities in the Middle East?

      What is the percentage of minority students at universities in Russia or in Eastern Europe?

      Your claim, and the claim of the UJ Senate is that the percentage of Arab students at BGU is unusually small when compared to other universities.

      So show us. Produce the figures.

      • Joseph Imber Says:

        Hi David,

        I apologise that I forgot to mention in my message that I’m a single issue website: I only focus on Zionist racism and its British supporters and do not address other issues. I will, however, welcome warmly any figures you will produce if this helps to counter racism be it Zionist or other. I will also support a boycott of Darfur provided that Engage will take the lead and organise it.

        • Jonathan Romer Says:

          Priceless!

        • Gil Says:

          Well thank God for Darfur’s victims that you aren’t boycotting that region. It’s Sudan you should be boycotting. Where’s Philip when you need him to set the record straight.

        • Brian Goldfarb Says:

          That is, I will give any figures I choose, claim that they are accurate because I say they are, but have no obligation to provide any sources to support my claims.

          On this basis, anyone can say anything and claim that are speaking the truth. How post-modern. How ridiculous. And how anti-intellectual.

        • zkharya Says:

          ‘I apologise that I forgot to mention in my message that I’m a single issue website’

          I.e. I am a monomaniacal drone, with but a single goal in mind, to dissolve, accidentally or otherwise, the state of the second or largest Jewish community in the world in the sea of Arab and Islamic apartheid states and societies, among whom those Israeli figures you cite would be a near infinite improvement.

          Thanks for trying perfect the one Jewish state from existence, but no thanks.

        • M Golding Says:

          Well done. Please can you send me your website address so I can keep updated as and when. Talking of England (and I have British citizenship) have you read A State Beyond the Pale by Robin Shepherd?

    • Jonathan Romer Says:

      The other nations of the Middle East seem to have solved that problem, not by raising the proportion of Jewish students and faculty to equal their representation in the population at large, but by reducing the number of Jews to match their exclusion from academia.

      Regarding “British Zionism”: Has anyone been asking for your unconditional allegiance to that, or to anything else? (I certainly wouldn’t — but then I’m not British.)

    • zkharya Says:

      ‘I hereby promise to declare my unconditional allegiance to British Zionism when identical figures and proportions will typify us.”

      How about when they typify the sea of Arab and Islamic apartheid states and societies, including the Palestinian?

      If they did, they would be an improvement.

      By all means try to perfect the Jewish state from existence, dissolve it in the Arab and Islamic apartheid sea in which it resides.

      I doubt most Israeli Jews will let you.

    • Thomas Venner Says:

      Sorry – “Palestinian citizens of Israel”? I think you mean Israeli Arabs. However much you might like to deny this (along with claiming that Israel is a “religious” state when it’s still very clearly secular, despite the best efforts of Shas and similar groups), they’re as Israeli as their Jewish counterparts. The United Arab List, which receives the votes of almost all Israeli Arabs, has held to this line for years. The only Israelis who continue to refer to Israeli Arabs as “Palestinians” are members of the far right, trying to effectively make them non-citizens. By insisting on doing this yourself as well, you are actually undermining them, and effectively placing yourself in the same category as people like Avigdor Lieberman.

      As for the supposed statistics on the proportion of Arab students in Israel’s universities, they look very dodgy. I don’t know about the small, obscure colleges, but most of the top twenty universities in Israel have around 20-25% Arab student populations.

      Also, one the original subject of the debate, has nobody at UJ even considered forming a few links with Palestinian universities? I mean, I’m sure the Palestinians think all this “showing solidarity” by boycotting the country next door is really sweet of you, but some actual direct support might be nice as well, otherwise they might, just possibly, start to think that you’re not really interested in them at all and you just want to drag them in as an excuse for a spot of “Zionist”-bashing, just like Britain did during the Mandate.

  14. Absolute Observer Says:

    I suppose also, considering the attempt to depict Israel as “apatheid” is to ask how many “Black” students were present at SA “white” universities during the apartheid era.

    n.b. I think Karl may wonder at being called “British”!!

  15. Blacklisted Dictator Says:

    http://www.mg.co.za/article/2010-10-01-more-varsities-check-israel-links

    Major South African universities began looking into their own ties with Israeli universities within hours of the University of Johannesburg’s (UJ) decision on Wednesday night to terminate its links with Ben-Gurion University unless it fulfils, within six months, two conditions UJ has specified.

  16. Blacklisted Dictator Says:

    http://www.thoughtleader.co.za/michaelfrancis/2010/10/01/israel-and-palestine-conflict-leaves-me-conflicted-2/

    “So to return to the conditional boycott that may be launched against Ben-Gurion University, I think it has a potential to be a good and a fair thing. But that if there are to be actual boycotts then they must be extended to Palestinian groups who extol hatred and have military connections of their own.”

  17. Ariel Says:

    So the source for those figures then Joseph?

  18. Absolute Observer Says:

    Hi Joseph,
    I came across these facts.
    I cannot find similar legislation in Israel.
    Since many make the claim to Israel=apartheid, could you, or anyone else tell me where to find it?

    “Extension of University Education Act, Act 45 of 1959
    Put an end to black students attending white universities (mainly the universities of Cape Town and Witwatersrand). Created separate tertiary institutions for whites, Coloured, blacks, and Asians.”

    “The Extension of University Education Act (No. 45) of 1959 prohibited established universities from accepting black students, except with the special permission of a cabinet minister. The government opened several new universities and colleges for black, coloured, and Indian students, and these students were allowed to attend a “white” university only if their “own” institutions became too overcrowded. The University of the North, established in 1959, for example, admitted students of Tsonga, Sotho, Venda, or Tswana descent only.”

    From 2003
    http://www.haaretz.com/print-edition/news/arab-university-opens-in-galilee-1.103390

    Here are some other stats.
    http://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20100205/world-news/ethnic-minorities-under-represented-at-elite-universities-in-britain-study

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/8493894.stm
    The Race for Opportunity report found ethnic minority students made up 14.1% of the total of students at 20 leading Russell Group universities.

    From 2003
    “Among the 772 universities where at least 5 per cent of undergraduates are black, the study found, 299 have graduation rates for blacks of under 30 per cent, 164 under 20 per cent and 68 under 10 per cent.”
    http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?storyCode=189131&sectioncode=26

  19. Blacklisted Dictator Says:

    I would be interested to read whether bloggers on this site think that Ben Gurion should comply with UJ’s demands. Moreover, do you believe that she can?

    • Brian Goldfarb Says:

      Of course not. It’s an interference with their academic freedom, especially as the only thing they have done wrong is to be a university in Israel.

      Is any other reply even remotely possible, sensible or sane?

    • Jonathan Romer Says:

      BD,

      Short answer, No & no: She shouldn’t and can’t, because every concession will be met with another demand and a denial that the last concession really happened. If you’ve been around long enough to see the withdrawal from Gaza, you know how this works: Israel’s enemies peddle the lie that the strip is still occupied and that even if it wasn’t, Israel deserves no credit until it leaves the West Bank also. After that it will be “until it gives the Holy Basin to the Palestinians”, and then “until it grants Palestinians a ‘right of return'”.

      “The conditions are that the memorandum of understanding governing the relationship between the two institutions be amended to include Palestinian universities chosen with the direct involvement of UJ,” the university said in a statement.

      “Additionally, UJ will not engage in any activities with BGU that have direct or indirect military implications, this to be monitored by UJ’s senate academic freedom committee.”

      UJ is at liberty to write whatever memoranda of understanding it likes for cooperation with Palestinian universities, just as BGU and other Israeli institutions have already done. If they want to create 3-way cooperation between BGU, UJ and some Palestinian other(s), they can do it by mutual agreement whenever they see fit, not as some power trip or bit of political grandstanding. As for a restriction on activities with military implications, if I were answering on behalf of BGU I might suggest that when UJ cuts its own military ties, and receives the same indulgence from all its other partners, I would be willing to consider such a change at BGU.

      Incidentally, at the risk of over-generalising I have the strong impression that the BGU faculty most strongly against a boycott are in the hard science departments and the advocates for one are in the social sciences. I wonder if the same thing is true at UJ? A cynic might suspect that social scientists have less to lose from being on either end of a boycott than physicists, biologists, engineers and medics have.

      • Bill Says:

        “A cynic might suspect that social scientists have less to lose from being on either end of a boycott than physicists, biologists, engineers and medics have.”

        There’s probably some truth to this but I don’t know how SA’s universities’ funding of research goes. There are some hard scientists in the BDS movement but these people are typically “established” and “secure” from what I can see. “Soft Money” positions (slots funded through competitive research grants and contracts — and these slots are increasing here in the US, our entire division has been soft for ages) are more likely to be in the sciences and engineering areas since these areas are more likely to rake in the cash. For people in those positions, being given a list of people with whom they shouldn’t collaborate is likely going be seen as an existential threat to their jobs and even their department/program. That’d be especially true if it’s being handed to them by tenured/hard/endowed positions who don’t shoulder the same (or any) risk. Even if it’s being done by a fellow soft-money scientific mercenary who has an established funding base, anyone pulling their chain will probably need to carry their boycotts-for-all arse home in a bucket.

        • Bill Says:

          (and that doesn’t count Middle East Studies, Jewish/Hebrew Studies and other depts that may require solid relations with Israeli Campuses, obviously)

        • Jonathan Romer Says:

          Thanks for the insights, Bill. I was of course being a little snide, and perhaps also winding up our sociologist-in-chief, David Hirsh. I more than half expected to be smacked upside the head by him for it (and may yet be).

  20. Bill Says:

    I suspect that JU may need a cooperative agreement with BGU more than the other way around. I would love to see BGU provide a counter list of requirements for JU, for example, expecting them to drop certain universities who are in other countries with less than perfect human rights. But once again, it’s those rules again. Those uppity Jews must rise above everything. Others need rise above nothing. Perfectly fair. Perfectly just. Perfectly convenient.

  21. David Hersch Says:

    As there is no real benefit to BGU, I think they should tell UJ to take a hike and leave them to their arrogance and ignorance. Let them know there is a price for playing these stupid games. I found Habib’s arrogant and self-righteous attitude on the recent radio debates exasperating and sickening. His reference to UJ’s “standards” etc was the pits.

    BGU, tell them to take their “co-operation” and shove it! UJ will be the loser.

  22. Blacklisted Dictator Says:

    “Political correctness in SA universities” by Rhoda Kadalie

    http://www.businessday.co.za/articles/Content.aspx?id=122805

  23. Brian Goldfarb Says:

    Thanks, BD, for the link: a most interesting article. Perhaps we should all run it off and mine it for future comments of our own.

  24. Blacklisted Dictator Says:

    BG,
    When Rhoda Kadalie writes in the SA press, it is as if she has pitched up from another universe where truth and common-sense prevail.


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