The Price of Kings: Shimon Peres – screening 30th January

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The Price of Kings: Shimon Peres

Film Screening & Discussion

Next Wednesday 30th January, at Kings College London, OneVoice will host an event to examine the legacy of President Shimon Peres, and the wider question of leadership in the region.

The Price of Kings: Shimon Peres

“I’ve never heard leaders speak like this before” – Total Politics
“Chills the blood” – The FT, “Uncompromising” – Huffington Post, “Outstanding” – The National
“Epic in scope, themes and revelations” – Rankin

Together with Kings College War Studies Society, the event will examine the legacy of President Shimon Peres and the wider question of leadership in the region with a Q&A after the screening.

Paul Charney (Chair, Zionist Federation)
Dr Ghada Karmi (Palestinian activist and academic)
John Lyndon (Executive Director, OneVoice Europe)
Richard Symons (Co-Director, The Price of Kings)

Venue: Room K4U.12, Kings Building, Strand Campus, Kings College London
Time: 7:00pm, Wednesday 30th January
Admission : FREE

We do hope you’ll be able to join us at Kings College for this event, and the subsequent screening next month of the second film examining the life and political legacy of Yasser Arafat.

OneVoice is an international mainstream grassroots movement that aims to amplify the voice of Israeli and Palestinian moderates, empowering them to seize back the agenda for conflict resolution and demand that their leaders achieve a two-state solution.

David Ward, Israel, the Holocaust and the Jews – by Sarah AB

Many have already written eloquently and thoughtfully about David Ward’s indefensible comments about Israel, the Holocaust and ‘the Jews’. Mark Gardner and Paul Evans, for example, have explained exactly why these comments are so offensive, although David Ward still doesn’t seem to get it.

I was struck by this misleading headline in the Huffington Post.

Lib Dem MP David Ward ‘Condemned’ By Own Party For Criticising Israel Ahead Of Holocaust Memorial Day”

This completely misses the point, and implicitly supports those who argue either that accusations of antisemitism are deployed strategically to silence criticism of Israel or else that those making the accusations are quite extraordinarily sensitive.

Although Sara Nelson (who probably didn’t write the headline herself) goes on to offer a reasonable account of the incident, her piece reveals further ill-judged responses to Ward’s remarks. She links to a supporter of Ward, blogger Mark Valladares. He has now edited his article after coming in for some criticism.

It’s welcome that he reflected further and tried to express his views with more nuance. However I still see (and I didn’t catch the earlier version, though I gather it referred to the angry response to Ward as a ‘bandwagon’) problems in the edited post:

As usual, in any matter related to the Israel/Palestine debate, elements of the pro-Israel lobby, (or troublemakers in Guido’s case) have chosen to interpret these remarks as being a direct comparison of the holocaust with modern events in Gaza and the West Bank. If you’re minded to do so, you probably will. On the other hand, if you lean towards a pro-Palestinian position, you might welcome any recognition by a politician that the Israeli government is behaving in an unacceptable manner.”

 Although Ward did not absolutely state that Gaza was another Warsaw, the parallel was still implicit and Valladares does not even pick up on the way Ward refers to ‘the Jews’ as an undifferentiated group. Also – to offer just one counterargument to Valladares’s assertion that politicians never criticize Israel – the Chair of Labour Friends of Israel spoke out against Netanyahu’s controversial announcement on settlement building last month, as did Conservative Friends of Israel.

There’s then this confusing passage:

For me, David’s words act as a reminder that some pretty dreadful wrongs have been committed against both sides (and there are those who seek to equate them in terms of scale), and suggest that past events should influence future behaviour.”

 Is he now suggesting that the sufferings of the Palestinians might indeed reasonably be compared to the Holocaust ‘in terms of scale’, or is he rather weighing up the sufferings of Israelis and Palestinians?

 Then he asserts:

 It’s called nuance, and in an increasingly black and white political discourse, I welcome his attempt to demonstrate some respect towards both sides in this seemingly never-ending dispute, even if he has failed to express himself well.”

 Now, this is ridiculous. Many commenters, from a range of perspectives, demonstrate ‘respect towards both sides’, and it is very easy to do so without trivializing the Holocaust.

Returning to the Huffington Post piece, the comments were depressingly dominated by those who thought Ward had made a jolly good point, and those who thought it was somehow all the fault of ‘the Muslims’. 

To Sally Hunt regarding UCU’s Holocaust Memorial Day film

An email to Sally Hunt from UCU member Vanessa Freedman. She sent it on 12th December last year and has yet to receive a reply. Meanwhile she posts it here.

Dear Sally

Thank you for your invitation to take part in the Holocaust Memorial Day film. I have no testimony to share as none of my family was directly affected by the Holocaust. In any case I have grave reservations about this project, which seems like mere window dressing given the UCU leadership’s continued refusal to address the issue of institutional antisemitism within the union – to the extent that one Jewish member has been driven to take legal action.

The Congress motion on antisemitism in 2009 that instructed  the NEC to organise events on Holocaust Memorial Day failed to mention antisemitism within the union; an amendment proposed by my branch – instructing the NEC also to investigate the reasons for resignations from UCU members apparently in connection with perceptions of institutional antisemitism – was defeated at Congress. Such an amendment should have been unnecessary: when letters to you include statements such as ‘I, like many others, can no longer bear the shame and embarrassment of belonging to an institution which is willing to discriminate against Jews, and whose readiness to do so is supported by leading members of its Executive Committee’ (Eve Garrard, 1 July 2008), and ‘this is the only organization with which I have been involved in which I have been made to feel uncomfortable as a Jew’ (Dov Stekel, 2008) you and the NEC should have taken these seriously.

Other instances of concern to Jewish and other members include UCU’s invitation to Bongani Masuku to speak at a seminar to discuss a boycott of Israel, even though the South African Human Rights Commission had deemed that Masuku’s statements amounted to hate speech against the country’s Jewish community; and Congress’s rejection of the EUMC definition of antisemitism, which has led to more resignations and statements like ‘whether intentionally or otherwise, this has made UCU an even more uncomfortable place for Jewish members than it was previously … your repeated claim that UCU abhors anti-Semitism is not borne out by the evidence; rather, the evidence points overwhelmingly in the other direction … I sent you three emails on related issues in 2008 … I think you would agree that a trade union which abhorred anti-Semitism would take such emails from an ordinary member seriously. Regrettably, I never received a reply to any of them … I no longer wish to contribute my money to an organisation which has a problem with institutionalised anti-Semitism’ (James Mendelson, 14 July 2011).

Unless you and the NEC are prepared to take these concerns seriously, initiatives to mark Holocaust Memorial Day are an empty, even cynical, exercise.

Regards

Vanessa Freedman

MA program in Holocaust Studies at Haifa University

Dear friends and colleagues,
 
After its success during the first year, the new MA Program in Holocaust Studies is now entering its second year and offers a unique combination of a multidisciplinary academic program alongside opportunities for internships, study tours and rich extra-curricular activities, as well volunteering in Holocaust Survivors’ communities in Israel.
 
The one-year International Master’s Program in Holocaust Studies at the University of Haifa is dedicated to creating and nurturing a new generation of Holocaust researchers and educators.
We are also pleased to let you know that the two chief Holocaust museums and archives in Israel – Yad Vashem and The Ghetto Fighters House – have joined forces with us to become integral components of the program. This unique and one of a kind cooperation places our program as a leading force in Holocaust studies in Israel and the world.
 
The program aims at providing students with more than just an academic curriculum; it has been designed with the addition of exciting and challenging activities to spark the interest of the student and encourage personal development and dedication to the field of Holocaust research.
 
We are now starting to accept applications for the 2013-2014 academic year. We would appreciate your help in introducing this program to your colleagues and students.
 
The program is unique in the well rounded interdisciplinary curriculum it offers, allowing the students to study the Holocaust from a wide variety of disciplines and perspectives (history, social psychology, anthropology, genocide and international law, literature and more). It guarantees that the students will train in diverse methodologies and essential languages. The academic faculty consists of established as well as young scholars who have studied in the best Universities in Israel and abroad.
 
Internships
An internship program is offered to enrich the curriculum and prepare students for actual employment upon graduation. Available internships include: Ghetto Fighters’ House Museum Archives, Yad Vashem Museum and archives, The Hagana Archive, the Atlit Detainee Camp and more.
 
Volunteer Program with Holocaust Survivors
Students receiving scholarships are required to participate in the Holocaust Survivors Community Giving Project, in coordination with the International Hillel Foundation. Within this framework, students donate their time in a number of ways, including visiting Holocaust survivors in their homes, leading workshops, and organizing holiday celebrations for the survivors.
 
Study tours to archives in Israel, Poland and Germany
As part of the experiential learning, students participate in study tours throughout the academic year, going to relevant museums and sites throughout Israel. A week-long seminar in Yad Vashem and regular visits to the Ghetto Fighters’ Museum provide students with the opportunity to implement their academic knowledge into real-life example, by seeing actual archives, historical records and documentation.
 
One of the highlights of the course is the study tour to Berlin, Germany and Warsaw, Poland. The study tour is designed to provide students with the opportunity to visit important historical archives, meet local German and Polish students and researchers, and visit important locations relevant to the study of the Holocaust.
 
Visit our web site for detailed information: http://holocaust-studies.haifa.ac.il
 
Best wishes,
Yael
 
Yael Granot-Bein, PhD.
Director,
Strochlitz Institute for Holocaust Research
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